Daniel Gross




Speech Topics

Reading the financial press gives many people cause to believe the world is passing the U.S. by. There’s a widespread perception that the U.S. doesn’t make anything the world wants, that American companies have lost their edge in competing overseas, and that the domestic market has been left for dead. But Daniel Gross argues that global growth is not a zero-sum game; that instead of passing us by, the rapidly growing global economy is taking America with it.

Through his extensive reporting travels, Gross has seen first-hand: how U.S. exports (even unlikely ones) continue to power economic growth; why companies and investors are flocking to the U.S. in unprecedented numbers; how the U.S. is successfully importing business models and technologies from the developing world; and how U.S. companies continue to demonstrate an ability to create global economic ecosystems that invite innovation. In fact, the untold story of recent years has been the ability of U.S. companies large and small, established and upstarts, to engage with the world in new and important ways.

The pervasive sense of American economic decline has been one of the biggest and most damaging legacies of the financial crisis and deep recession. Rampant growth in China and emerging markets, coupled with seemingly intractable problems at home – huge deficits, political paralysis, high unemployment – have created a sense that America can no longer set the pace for the global economy. Gross lays out the rational case for optimism, noting the ways in which the U.S. has maintained economic leadership in recent years – and how it continues to do so. His argument is based on extensive reporting inside and outside the U.S., a deep knowledge of history, and an understanding of what makes the U.S. economy unique in an increasingly homogenized world.


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Biography

Daniel Gross is one of the most widely read financial and economic writers working today. He is the executive editor of Strategy+Business and previously served as the global business editor for Newsweek & The Daily Beast, as well as a featured columnist at Slate. Before joining Newsweek in the spring of 2007, Mr. Gross wrote the “Economic View” column in the New York Times, was a contributing writer to New York, and contributed regularly to magazines such as Fortune and Wired. From 1998-2007, Gross served as the editor of STERNBusiness, a semi-annual academic magazine on economics and management published by the New York University Stern School of Business.

A native of East Lansing, Michigan, Mr. Gross graduated from Cornell University in 1989, with degrees in government and history, and holds an A.M. in American history from Harvard University (1991). He worked as a reporter at The New Republic and Bloomberg News, and has contributed hundreds of features, news articles, book reviews and opinion pieces to over 60 magazines and newspapers. Areas of expertise include: economic and tax policy, the links between business and politics, the rise of the investor class, the culture of Wall Street, and business history.

He is the author of several books, most recently, Better, Stronger, Faster: The Myth of American Decline… and the Rise of a New Economy, (May 2012).

Mr. Gross appears frequently in the media. A regular guest on CNBC, MSNBC, and National Public Radio, he has also appeared on CNN, Fox News Channel, The Newshour with Jim Lehrer, Bloomberg Television, C-SPAN, BBC, and Reuters TV, and on more than 50 radio programs and talk shows. Mr. Gross lives in Westport, Conn., with his wife and two children






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