Watch David Baron on CBS Sunday Morning

Following up his featured TED talk, David Baron was interviewed for a piece on the eclipse by CBS Sunday Morning.

Science writer David Baron is another self-proclaimed umbraphile. He’s seen five eclipses. “My first was in Aruba in 1998,” he said. “It was the most awe-inspiring, I dare say, spiritual experience I’ve ever had. And I say this as a science journalist.” Baron’s new book, American Eclipse, recalls an earlier era’s eclipse sensation, on July 29, 1878: “The path that the Moon’s shadow took went right across the Wild West, from Montana Territory down to Texas. Dozens of American astronomers headed out to the west to observe that eclipse. The most prominent scientist to come out that year was Thomas Edison.” [WATCH HERE]

Read the latest op-eds from Carol Anderson

On the heels of Carol Anderson’s NY Times piece, “The Policies of White Resentment,” she has written for The Guardian about the recent tragedy in Charlottesville.

The United States is in a tailspin. White supremacists are on the march – and have left a trail of blood and destruction in their wake. A march in Charlottesville, Virginia, filled with torches, Nazi flags and chants of “White Lives Matter” culminated in violence that claimed at least one life, and left many more injured. [TheGuardian.com]

David Baron’s TED Talk featured at TED.com

On August 21, 2017, the moon’s shadow will race from Oregon to South Carolina in what some consider to be the most awe-inspiring spectacle in all of nature: a total solar eclipse. Umbraphile David Baron chases these rare events across the globe, and in this ode to the bliss of seeing the solar corona, he explains why you owe it to yourself to witness one, too. [TED.com]

You Can Do Anything, the new book by George Anders, is out now

“Utterly fascinating and massively important. George Anders peers into his signature crystal ball, and paints a portrait of the future of work that’s as compelling as it is provocative.”―Adam Grant, Wharton professor and New York Times bestselling author of Give and Take and Originals

In a tech-dominated world, the most needed degrees are the most surprising: the liberal arts. Did you take the right classes in college? Will your major help you get the right job offers? For more than a decade, the national spotlight has focused on science and engineering as the only reliable choice for finding a successful post-grad career. Our destinies have been reduced to a caricature: learn to write computer code or end up behind a counter, pouring coffee. Quietly, though, a different path to success has been taking shape. In YOU CAN DO ANYTHING, George Anders explains the remarkable power of a liberal arts education – and the ways it can open the door to thousands of cutting-edge jobs every week.

 

 

A comprehensive guide to the new science of treating lower back pain

Vox has a new profile of Cathryn Jakobson Ramin and her new book, Crooked.

Cathryn Jakobson Ramin’s back pain started when she was 16, on the day she flew off her horse and landed on her right hip. For the next four decades, Ramin says her back pain was like a small rodent nibbling at the base of her spine. The aching left her bedridden on some days and made it difficult to work, run a household, and raise her two boys. By 2007, she couldn’t so much as sit or walk for more than a few minutes without experiencing what felt like jolts of electricity shooting up and down her spine. [Vox.com]

Sandeep Jauhar on “Empathy Gadgets”

Sandeep Jauhar’s latest NY Times piece is about empathy gadgets, how tech and healthcare are using machines to foster understanding and compassion.

The demonstration took place this year at a hotel in Midtown Manhattan. The device, a new technology called the SymPulse, was feeding a signal into my arm that simulated the tremors of a patient with Parkinson’s disease. My mother had Parkinson’s. For years, I’d wanted — and struggled — to understand what she was going through. That day I finally got my chance. [NYTimes.com]

Mike Erwin’s new book reviewed in the Wall Street Journal

Mike Erwin’s Lead Yourself First was recently reviewed in the WSJ.

Former Campbell Soup CEO Doug Conant runs into it in his garden. For entrepreneur Sarah Dillard, it’s to be found when she’s hiking. Tim Hall, a cycling coach, grabs some of it while gazing out at his bird feeder over coffee every morning. The pastor Jimmy Bartz encounters it while fly fishing. What they are discovering, as Raymond M. Kethledge and Michael S. Erwin report in “Lead Yourself First,” is solitude, a vitally necessary but all too scarce commodity for organizational leaders.[WSJ.com]