Read the latest from Chris Chabris in the WSJ

Chris’s latest is “A New Deal in Card Games.”

A simple deck of playing cards is incredibly versatile. With just 52 cards divided into four suits of 13 ordered ranks, you can play a seemingly infinite variety of games— without even adding the jokers, which figure mainly in “house rules” variants of standard games. Amazingly, considering the simplicity of the equipment, hundreds of those games are actually fun. David Parlett’s “Penguin Book of Card Games” details about 250 of them, divided into 24 categories, from familiar favorites like Bridge and Hearts to more obscure games like Grevjass and Six-bid. [WSJ.com]

Read Nick Tasler on “Stop Using the Excuse “Organizational Change Is Hard”

At the Harvard Biz blog, Nick Tasler has penned a new piece.

During nearly every discussion about organizational change, someone makes the obvious assertion that “change is hard.” On the surface, this is true: change requires effort. But the problem with this attitude, which permeates all levels of our organizations, is that it equates “hard” with “failure,” and, by doing so, it hobbles our change initiatives, which have higher success rates than we lead ourselves to believe. [HBR.org]

New Details Emerge From Investigation Of Slain NPR Journalists


A year ago, new BrightSight speaker Tom Bowman lost two of his NPR colleagues as they were “ambushed on a remote road in southern Afghanistan while on a reporting assignment traveling with the Afghan National Army.”

Since their deaths, NPR has been investigating what happened, and today we are sharing new information about what we learned. It’s a very different story from what we originally understood. The two men were not the random victims of bad timing in a dangerous place, as initial reports indicated. Rather, the journalists’ convoy was specifically targeted by attackers who had been tipped off to the presence of Americans in Afghanistan’s Helmand province. [NPR.org]

New interview with Carmine Gallo at Worth

“Master raconteur and author of the upcoming book The Storyteller’s Secret, Carmine Gallo talks about struggle, persuasion and the importance of sharing stories.”

WHAT MADE YOU DECIDE TO WRITE SPECIFICALLY ABOUT STORYTELLING? I wrote Talk Like Ted (2014), which I viewed as a public-speaking book. Very few people will actually ever give a TED talk. But I wanted to identify what it is about some of the world’s greatest public speakers—how did they go about delivering these presentations that went viral? There are a lot of elements about how to prepare and how to rehearse. But the chapter that really caught on was about storytelling. [Worth.com]

Daniel McGinn’s book tops this Forbes Summer Reading List

Psyched Up by Daniel McGinn is the first book on Forbes’ Kimberly Whitler’s summer reading list.

To kick it off, I will share a hot-off-of-the-presses book that I have really enjoyed. It’s Psyched Up: How the Science of Mental Preparation Can Help you Succeed, by Daniel McGinn. It isn’t a marketing, management, technical, or leadership book. Rather, this book combines theory, research, and practice to uncover the scientific approaches that can help strengthen mental preparation, resulting in greater success. What I particularly like about the book is that it is written by an artful, vivid storyteller who has appreciation for research and evidence-based insight. The tools provided can help anybody, whether giving a big speech or making an important client pitch or preparing for an interview, build a pre-game muscle to achieve better game-time performance. [Forbes.com]

Sam Weinman on why “Confidence Kills”

Sam Weinman has written a new piece for Golf Digest, “Confidence Kills: What If Everything You’ve Been Told To Think Is Wrong?”

Most golfers have selective memories. Ask us to recount our best shots, and we can tell you the club we hit, where we hit it, and whatever it was we just had for lunch. It’s everything else that tends to be a blur. The implication of needing just one great shot to “bring you back” is that you’re choosing to repress all the mediocre shots that came before and after. [GolfDigest.com]